Movie Review: Avengers: Infinity War

10 years ago I saw the first Iron Man in theaters with my dad. I was 15 years old, but the proceeding films had a massive influence on my late formative years. I got into comics thanks to MCU, opening up a whole new world of storytelling that changed me as a writer. Some of the most impactful books I have ever read are comics and the movie franchise that started it all is about to reach its ultimate climax.

While on the hunt for the Infinity Stones, the Mad Titan Thanos, played by Josh Brolin, travels to Earth to recover the last of the stones. His arrival signals all the heroes to come together to stop him.

Infinity War is technically the first of two parts, but it feels like the MCU’s greatest experiment. These films have been coming out for a decade with dozens of characters and continuity threads brought together into one movie. I cannot fathom the mental gymnastics required to pull off such an immense feat. It is not just a question of juggling an ensemble, but an ensemble with layers of continuity that influence the shared world.

As a comics reader Infinity War has a lot in common with an event story, a one-shot arc where most of the characters in the Marvel Pantheon assemble for a universe-changing story. A few notable events include Civil War, Secret Invasion, and AvX. The Avengers films are also event stories, but on a smaller scale in the context they bring together whoever showed up in the last few movies. With Infinity War, it is more appropriate to think of it as an event, taking in the whole of the MCU for one half of an epic story.

Not unlike Star Trek: Beyond, the film takes control of the ensemble by pairing up characters into different groups, and setting them off on their own adventures. Thor joins the Guardians, Iron Man with Dr. Strange, and Captain America teams with Black Panther. Then the groups splinter into smaller teams to achieve their own objectives, sometimes running into others along the way. This is where Infinity War shines because you have characters with years’ worth of development bouncing off of each other. Their interactions are rife with clever banter, emotional intensity, and arguments on how to approach an objective. It is the essence of the MCU taken to its logical extreme without feeling overwhelming.

While Infinity War has everything we have seen before, it is the first time we get to know Thanos. In the comics he was one in a long line of villains that love Death and/or want to die. To achieve this goal he decided to be a genocidal maniac. I never liked him, but Brolin’s Thanos is rich in depth. His motives go far beyond being bad to be bad or that he wants to die. He has a grand vision and the sacrifices he makes take a very clear toll on him as a person. Despite the character being entirely CG, this is Brolin’s best performance since No Country for Old Men. Not even kidding. Thanos is the best part of Infinity War and the reason to see it.

There is one hang up that may be a problem. Being so dense with characters and tons of great action to rival Winter Soldier, there is a lot to digest. Get ready for the longest 160 minutes of your life. However, it is probably for the best because Infinity War could have (should have) been much longer. It was the correct choice to focus on Thanos, but he has a quartet of minions that are visually distinct and nothing else. I read the story that the film takes its name and those minions have unique names and reasons for joining Thanos. In there cinematic incarnation, we hear only one of their names and no more character development beyond they serve Thanos. If you see the movie and want more, check out Jonathan Hickman’s event story of the same name.

Like always I am keeping this short because Infinity War is good. Why give everything away when it would hurt the experience? It is the culmination of 10 years of movies full of characters and continuity brought together in a single film and it is just the first half to an epic climax. Go see it immediately.

Muh book:

http://a.co/0KBwIxA

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